Gods and Demons Wiki
Advertisement

The Cover for the Book of Enoch (Art by Thomas R Horn)

Be careful with that! That Book of Enoch was written down by Metatron himself. The total income of a developed country for an entire century won't be enough to repair a single page on that thing if it is damaged.
Matt Wright

The Book of Enoch (also 1 Enoch; Ge'ez: መጽሐፈ ሄኖክ, maṣḥafa hēnok) is an ancient Hebrew apocalyptic religious text, ascribed by tradition to Enoch, the great-grandfather of Noah.

Overview

Enoch contains unique material on the origins of demons and Nephilim, why some angels fell from heaven, an explanation of why the Genesis flood was morally necessary, and prophetic exposition of the thousand-year reign of the Messiah.

Various Aramaic fragments found in the Dead Sea Scrolls, as well as Koine Greek and Latin fragments, are proof that the Book of Enoch was known by Jews and early Near Eastern Christians. This book was also quoted by some 1st and 2nd century authors as in the Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs. Authors of the New Testament were also familiar with some content of the story. A short section of 1 Enoch (1:9) is cited in the New Testament Epistle of Jude, Jude 1:14–15, and is attributed there to "Enoch the Seventh from Adam" (1 Enoch 60:8), although this section of 1 Enoch is a midrash on Deuteronomy 33:2. Several copies of the earlier sections of 1 Enoch were preserved among the Dead Sea Scrolls.

Description

It is not part of the biblical canon used by Jews, apart from Beta Israel (Ethiopian Jews). While the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church and Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church consider the Book of Enoch as canonical, other Christian groups regard it as non-canonical or non-inspired, but may accept it as having some historical or theological interest.

The first part of the Book of Enoch describes the fall of the Watchers, the angels who fathered the angel-human hybrids called Nephilim. The remainder of the book describes Enoch's revelations and his visits to heaven in the form of travels, visions, and dreams.

The book consists of five quite distinct major sections:

  • The Book of the Watchers (1 Enoch 1–36)
  • The Book of Parables of Enoch (1 Enoch 37–71) (also called the Similitudes of Enoch)
  • The Astronomical Book (1 Enoch 72–82) (also called the Book of the Heavenly Luminaries or Book of Luminaries)
  • The Book of Dream Visions (1 Enoch 83–90) (also called the Book of Dreams)
  • The Epistle of Enoch (1 Enoch 91–108)

Quotes

Gallery

Trivia

Advertisement