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Illustration of various deities associated with polytheistic pantheons (Art by William Cooke)

Thousands upon thousands of deities, all belonging to the same family. Some are more associated with one group, some with others. No matter what pantheon they're apart of however, the will always be known as gods.
Carl Black.

A Pantheon is a particular set of every god of any Religion, Mythology, Folklore, Culture, or Tradition.

Overview

A pantheon of gods is a common element of polytheistic societies, although not all polytheists have such a pantheon, and not all pantheons require a polytheistic worldview. The nature of a society's pantheon can be considered a reflection of that society.

Some well-known historical polytheistic pantheons include the Sumerian gods and the Egyptian gods, and the classical-attested pantheon which includes the ancient Greek religion and Roman religion. Post-classical polytheistic religions include Norse Æsir and Vanir, the Yoruba Orisha, the Aztec gods, and many others. Today, most historical polytheistic religions are referred to as "mythology".

Description

In many civilizations, pantheons tended to grow over time. Deities first worshipped as the patrons of cities or places came to be collected together as empires extended over larger territories. Conquests could lead to the subordination of the elder culture's pantheon to a newer one, as in the Greek Titanomachia, and possibly also the case of the Æsir and Vanir in the Norse mythos.

Cultural exchange could lead to "the same" deity being renowned in two places under different names, as seen with the Greeks, Etruscans, and Romans, and also to the cultural transmission of elements of an extraneous religion into a local cult, as with worship of the ancient Egyptian deity Osiris, which was later followed in ancient Greece. Max Weber's 1922 opus Economy and Society discusses tendency in the ancient Greek philosophers to interpret gods worshiped in the pantheons of other cultures as "equivalent to and so identical with the deities of the moderately organized Greek pantheon".

In other instances, however, national pantheons were consolidated or simplified into fewer gods, or into a single god with power over all of the areas originally assigned to a pantheon. For example, in the ancient Near East during the first millennium BCE, Syrian and Palestinian tribes worshiped much smaller pantheons than had been developed in Egypt and Mesopotamia. Weber also identified the link between a pantheon of gods and the development of monotheism, proposing that the domination of a pantheon by a particular god within that pantheon was a step towards followers of the pantheon seeing that god as "an international or universal deity, a transnational god of the entire world".

The first known instance of a pantheon being consolidated into a single god, or discarded in favor of a single god, was with the development of the short-lived practice of Atenism in ancient Egypt, with that role being accorded to the sun god. A similar process is thought to have taken place with respect to the Israelite deity Yahweh, who, "as a typical West Semitic deity... would have four or five compatriot gods in attendance as he became the national high god".

For beings to be apart of a pantheon, they would have to be a deity or at least deity-like, this includes deities, Old Ones, Aeons, Archons, Sefirots, Kupua, greater spirits and fairies, and other deity-like beings. Below is a list of every known pantheon by continent and notable deities from those pantheons.

North America

Algonquin

Abenaki

Blackfoot

  • Apistotookii

Lenape

  • Kishelemukong

Cherokee

  • Unetlanvhi

Church of SubGenius

  • Jehovah 1

Creek

  • Ibofanga

Crow

  • Akbaatatdia

Haida

Ho-Chunk

  • Red Horn

Hopi (Hopi / Zuni / Keresan / Tewa)

  • Tawa
  • Angwusnasomtaka
  • Awanyu
  • Amitolane

Inuit

Iroquois

  • Hahgwehdiyu

Kwakiutl

  • Kewkwaxa'we

Lakota

  • Wakan Tanka

Mesoamerican

Aztec

Mayan

Mixtec

  • Dzahui

Olmec

  • Olmec Dragon

Teotihuacan

Zapotec

  • Cocijo

Mexican

  • Santa Muerte

Miꞌkmaq

  • Niskam

Miwok / Ohlone

Narragansett

  • Cautantowwit

Navajo / Navaho

  • Asdzą́ą́ Nádleehé

Nuu-chah-nulth

  • Andakout

Pastafarian

  • Flying Spaghetti Monster

Pawnee

  • Tirawa

Saint Louis University

  • Billiken

Salish

  • Amotken

Saneca

  • Eagentci

Scientology

Snohomish

  • Dohkwibuhch

Taíno

  • Yayaaf

Wyandot

  • Iosheka

South America

Aymara

Brazilian

  • Ci

Chilean

Chilote

  • Pincoya

Mapuche

  • Ten Ten-Vilu
  • Coi Coi-Vilu

Inca

Guaraní

Mochica

  • Ai apaec

Muisca

  • Chiminigagua

Patagonian

Selk'nam

  • Temáukel

Talamancan

  • Sibú

Uru

  • Tiw

Europe

Albanian

  • Zojz

Baltic

Latvian

  • Ūsiņš

Lithuanian

Prussian

  • Auseklis

Basque

  • Sugaar
  • Mari

Celtic

Gaelic (Irish / Scottish)

Brythonic (Welsh / Breton / Cornish / Arthurian)

Circassian

  • Theshxwe

Dacian / Thracian

  • Zamolxis

Estonian

  • Pikne

Etruscan

  • Catha

Finnish

Greek

Hungarian

  • Ördög

Illyrian

  • En

Lusitanian

  • Endovelicus

Mangarevan

  • Tu

Mari

  • Kugu Jumo

Minoan

  • Ariadne

Norse / Germanic

Ossetian

  • Xucau

Proto-Indo-European

  • Dyeus

Roman

Sami

  • Beaivi

Slavic

Thelemic

Wicca

Ugrian

  • Num-Torum

Middle East

Abrahamic (Judaism / Christian / Islam)

Gnosticism

Kabbalah

Anatolian

Hittite

  • Arinna

Luwian

  • Tarḫunz

Palaic

  • Ziparwa

Arabian Pre-Islam

Qataban

  • Anbay

Qedarite

  • Atarsamain

Nabataeans

  • Al-Lat

Sabaean

  • Almaqah

Hurrian

Levantine (Canaanite / Phoenician / Ugaritic)

Mesopotamian

Akkadian

  • Antu

Assyrian

Babylonian

Moabite

Sumerian

Yazidi

  • Melek Taus

Zoroastrian

Africa

Akan

Axumite / Aksumite

  • Beher

Baluba

  • Kabezya-Mpungu

Berber

  • Gurzil

Bushongo

  • Mbombo

Dahomean

  • Nana Buluku

Dinka

  • Nhialic

Dogon

  • Amma

Efik

  • Abasi

Egyptian

Georgian

  • Adgilis Deda

Guanches

  • Achamán

Igbo

  • Ahia Njoku

Lugbara

  • Adroa  

Lotuka / Otuho

  • Ajok

Lozi

  • Nyambe

Maasai

  • Ngai

Malagasy

  • Zanahary

Mbuti / Pygmy

  • Khonvoum

Nyanga

  • Nkuba

Nubian

  • Dedun

San

  • Kaggen

Serer

  • Roog

Shona

  • Mwari

Somali

  • Waaq

Tumbuka

  • Chiuta

Urhobo

  • Ọghẹnẹ

Vainakh

  • Deela

Voodoo

Yoruba

  • Olorun
  • Olodumare

Zulu

  • Unkulunkulu

Asia

Ainu

  • Kamuy-huci

Armenian

  • Aramazd

Austronesian

  • Hainuwele

Buddhism

  • Brahmā

Burmese

  • Thagyamin

Chinese

Dravidian

  • Seyyon

Elamite

  • Naprisha

Hindu

Iban

  • Sengalang Burung

Indonesian (Balinese / Batak / Javanese / Sundanese)

Jain

  • Rishabhanatha

Japanese

Korean

Manchu

  • Abka Enduri

Philippine

Tagalog

  • Bathala

Visayan

  • Kan-Laon

Qiang

  • Mubyasei

Ryukyuan

  • Amamikyu

Sanamahism / Manipuri / Kanglei

  • Kuru
  • Lainingthou Sanamahi

Scythian

  • Tabiti

Sikhism

  • Waheguru

Tibetan

  • Chenrezig
  • Vajrapani

Turko-Mongol (Turkic / Mongol)

Viatnamese

  • Lạc Long Quân

Oceania

Australian Aboriginal

New South Wales

  • Birrahgnooloo

Northern Territory

  • Karora

Queensland

  • Anjea

South Australia

  • Akurra

Tasmania

  • Moinee

Victoria

Western Australia

  • Bagadjimbiri

Fijan

John Frum movement

  • John Frum

Polynesian

Cook Islands

  • Varima-te-takere

Hawaiian

Māori

Rapa Nui

Samoan

  • Tagaloa

Tahiti

  • Ta'aroa

Tongan

  • Hikule'o

Internet

Creepypasta

LessWrong

Unicornism

  • Invisible Pink Unicorn

Pop Culture

American Gods

Chronicles of Narnia

  • Aslan

Diablo

  • Trag'Oul

D&D

  • Corellon Larethian

Galaxy Fight

  • Felden

Ghosts 'n Goblins

Kid of Icarus

  • Palutena

Kirby

Legacy of Kain

  • The Elder God

Lovecraftian

Zothiquan

Marvel

  • Phoenix Force

Mortal Kombat

  • Raiden

Pegāna

  • Sish

Primal Rage

  • Blizzard

Rayman

SCP

Silent Hill

Terraria

The Ritual

  • Moder

Tokusatsu

Tolkien

  • Morgoth

Trevor Henderson

  • Chicken Ghost

William Blake

World of Warcraft

  • Y'Shaarj

Original to the GaD wiki

River Valley

Wyrdtraum

Quotes

A pantheon is an overview of a given culture's gods and goddesses and reflects not only the society's values but also its sense of itself. A pantheon directed by a thunderbolt wielding autocrat might suggest a patriarchy and the valuing of warrior skills. A pantheon headed by a great-mother goddess could suggest a village-based agricultural society. To confront the pantheon of the Egyptians is to confront a worldview marked by a sense of death and resurrection and the agricultural importance of the cycles of nature. The Greek pantheon is a metaphor for a pragmatic view of life that values art, beauty, and the power of the individual, and that is somewhat skeptical about human nature.
Christopher R. Fee.

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